Wednesday, June 06, 2007

Thinking of a time when everything was right

Are you in favor of graduation ceremonies for grade levels other than 12th?

A simple yes or no will do. Or, if you are feeling particularly pithy, explain in sordid detail why you favor or do not.

Discuss.

14 comments:

hoobie said...

No. HS, college, grad school. These have meaning. Graduating from middle school does not.

Liz Self said...

No.

turtle toes said...

I am not fond of graduation ceremonies. My three older children have participated in their preschool ceremonies and the youngest will in two years. Thankfully our school system only has high school graduation - none of the kindergarten or middle school have a graduation.

jmb said...

No, a school party maybe, nothing academic.

ami said...

I'm a little nostalgic for my junior high graduation. It may not be the transition into adulthood that HS graduation is, but it is a movement from childhood to journeyman adult. For the kids, it is an important event in their young lives that they are now just becoming aware of.

Sarabeth said...

Let me add the definition of graduation:

a. Conferral or receipt of an academic degree or diploma marking completion of studies.

b. A ceremony at which degrees or diplomas are conferred; a commencement.


The end of middle school does not mark the completion of studies. Sorry, Ami. Nostalgia doesn't work with me.

Kell said...

Aw, I didn't even want to go to my high school and college graduations. (Mom: "Kelly, I did not support you for four years only to NOT go to your graduation!") If it's any consolation to those who feel ceremony is important, I did, enjoy flying up to girl scouts from Brownies... Something about walking over that little bridge was very meaningful to me.

I don't know - perhaps the end of Brownies meant something. As soon as I was a Girl Scout, I quit.

Elizabeth said...

No. Just no.

But also --

Congratulations! You have been tagged with a Thinking Blogger Award:
http://cvillewords.wordpress.com/2007/06/07/the-thinking-blogger-award/.

Thanks for making me think!

Trixie said...

No. Just another requirement in an already busy life. Mark it at home. Celebrate privately. Are we teaching children that they need public recognition for every milestone surpassed?

hoobie said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
hoobie said...

It's along the lines of giving a trophy to every kid on every ball team. If you want a trophy then practice and play hard enough to be the best, and if you want a graduation, then graduate from something worthwhile.

Employers are already reporting that new hires and other younger employees require a lot of praise and stroking for every little accomplishment.

ElfMom said...

No. I think it takes away from the real graduation, that is, a completetion, a piece of paper.

dragon knitter said...

at one time, graduation from junior high was necessary, because many of the students didn't go on to high school. i suppose, in that case, it's almost the euqivalent of high school and college, now. my class was the last to have an 8th grade graduation.

i think an end of school party is appropriate. however, when my son graduated from elementary school (they don't do anything for middle school here in omaha), the ceremony was longer than most high school ceremonies i have attended. i was thoroughly disgusted that they had TEN student speakers (most of whom read their speeches), and worn out by the end.

no. just high school, college, and graduate schools. those are REAL accomplishments.

Genevieve said...

A hundred years ago -- even 75 years ago -- 8th grade graduation was really a milestone. An 8th grade education was much more than a lot of working-class kids got.

Nowadays, attendance is mandatory to age 16 or thereabouts, so graduations for kids under the age of 16 don't really have much significance.

I agree with jmb that a party is a good way to mark the lesser transitions from one educational level to another for younger kids. Graduation ceremonies should be for major accomplishments -- the completions of high school and college.